• States that have not acceded to any of the Statelessness Conventions
  • States that have acceded to the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons
  • States that have acceded also to the 1963 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness

 

The 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness are the two key international frameworks meant to reduce statelessness.

Contracting countries observe basic rules, such as treating stateless people on the same basis as any other immigrant. But that just being party to a treaty doesn’t mean that countries respect stateless people’s rights in practice. See the map to see which members of the EU are parties to the conventions. The US is party to neither.

On the map you can also see how many stateless people the US and each country in the EU has by clicking on the country. Definitions of statelessness vary wildly between countries, meaning these counts may not always be accurate. For timelines you can search in the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees database. The Baltic states have particularly high numbers because of a large Russian speaking minority that is granted almost all basic rights but does not automatically receive citizenship.